December 30, 2017

When going out for a drive, Car owners should take great care not just about their life but also of their car. But sadly not every car owner is cautious while driving which leads to road accidents and ultimately them ending-up paying unexpected expenses.

If you’re a car owner without car insurance you should consider buying one, as owning a car without an insurance policy can be a living nightmare full of bills that need paying.

1.) medical bills-

A car accident can lead to injuries which ultimately land you in a hospital where you spend time in recovering and paying your medical bills.

2.) medical bills of the people injured-

If the people around the incident were injured as well, you would also have to pay their medical bills.

3.) Repair costs of the property damaged-

Say for instance your car collided with the entrance of someone’s front gate. You end up paying for their damaged gate as well.

4.) Repair costs of the car-

And let’s not forget about the repair costs of your damaged vehicle.

5.) Totalled car

Say for instance you were driving a car that you just bought with an EMI plan. It’s the third month and your car is completely totalled because of an accident.

In other words, you lose your perfectly new car and would still have to pay the EMI amount every month.

You’ll be surprised to know that at times mishap to your car can also happen because of external factors like –

1.) Vandalism

Scratches, dents, broken glass, graffiti, glue in keyholes, and slashed tires are some of the most common types of vandalism faced in inner cities.

2.) Theft of car parts

Thieves find this to be an effective way of making easy money, as stealing car parts don’t require much skill and can be accomplished in minutes.

3.) Stolen cars

Every year, police make some progress in recovering stolen cars however, the recovery rate is still not close to the total number of cars stolen.

4.) Riots

Riot is a time when parked cars face maximum damage in the form of loots and vandalism.

5.) Flooding

From forming rust to damaged electronic wiring, floods are a natural disaster that can ruin your brand new car.

Yes, owning a vehicle comes with a lot of unexpected expenses that you need paying, especially if you don’t have car insurance. Which is why it is crucial that every car owner goes for car insurance.…

It was not raining when Noah built the ark. You must have seen that sticker somewhere at one time or the other. In the same way, you should not already be in need of long term care before you start looking for a long term care insurance policy. It will be too late then. However, getting it as some other point in your life could also be too early. Here's the right time for you …

If there's a history of health conditions that require long term care in your family, note the average age when they began to need special care. You will do well to subtract at least ten years or even more and then get long term care insurance then. Waiting to do it at a later date may be too late for you. It's usually very difficult to get it when the evidences of its need become obvious.

If you do not have such a history in your family but realize that due to certain habits, job hazards, accidents, exposures, etc, you may need special care down the road, you'll do well to get your long term care insurance policy long before the projected period of need.

For those who are simply growing old gracefully, waiting till you're fifty may not be a bad idea. However, if you prefer playing it real safe, you can get it now. Like everything in insurance, the more likely you'll not need it, the much lower your premium.

Look at what you'll pay and compare it with the peace of mind you'll have. If you do thorough research you'll get long term care insurance at very low rates. So making it a lot less demanding even if you decide to get it now. …

Ask just about anyone considering whether to start a business what they believe to be the biggest obstacle to starting that business and the answer is almost always, money. It's a matter of, "I do not have the money" or "I do not know how to get the money" or "Even if I tried, I do not think I could get the money." It is a valid concern. Many businesses fail in the first three years because they are under capitalized to withstand the ramp up period needed by many new business ventures. The bottom line- money matters. But, the more intriguing question is how much?

On our website, we encourage aspiring entrepreneurs to check their entrepreneurial readiness with a short online survey. Rather than "score" the respondent, the intent is both to highlight the success factor gaps that are most significant to a particular person and to gather information to pain a profile of the aspiring entrepreneur. Several of the questions refer to money matters and simultaneously what the largest perceivable barriers are to starting a business. The results of the survey present an interesting paradox ~ Is Money What is Really Holding You Back From Starting a Business?

As of the end of July, 68% of the survey participants indicated that they understand the costs of starting a business and either have a plan for or an idea of ​​how to acquire them, yet almost a third of those responders also cite money as one of the primary obstacles they have to overcome. As we reviewed the responses of these individuals, we also discovered another piece of the puzzle. Most of these responders, also indicated that they had access to an alternate source of income and could wait from one to three years for the business to become viable. So, here's the paradox -if these individuals want to start a business, understand the financial requirements, have a strategy form meeting them, and have other means to support themselves, how is it that money is the obstacle?

Reconciling the inconsistency is critical because it absolutely will separate those who absolutely take that final first step towards entrepreneurship and those who will likely look back on the disappointment of an unfulfilled promise. Is it that money is the true obstacle or is it possible that aversion to losing that money is the real culprit? Our hypothesis is this-money matters, but not as much as people think.

What are some possible explanations for the inconsistency? One could be that while you may understand what you need to do to gather the financial resources to start a business and know what you can do to acquire them, at the end of the day, you find yourself somehow unwilling or unable to commit to the actions necessary to build the "nest egg". Alternately, it could be that the connection is really tied to the unwillingness to risk losing either what you have today or even what you save to support that new business. …