October 6, 2017

When people talk about financial things, you tend to hear the term stocks and bonds thrown around, but are they the same thing? The short answer is no. Stocks and bonds are different entities although they belong in the same financial framework as they are both things to make money and both things that can be bought and sold.

Bonds by definition are an instrument of indebtedness. While that doesn’t sound very appealing and not very much on the side of making money, in fact they are used to make money. It is a case of debt security. Your company wants financing and so to get that you get into the bond market.

The issuer holds the holder debt and then pays interest and/or repays the loan at a later date. Think of it like a regular loan, only the time you have to repay them can vary largely, most have a 30 year term, some have upwards of 50 years and some don’t have a maturity date at all.

You, if you hold bonds will have to pay interest at fixed times throughout the term, usually on a regular basis and they, in turn will fund your endeavors to finance long term investments. Regular small businesses wouldn’t necessarily have to go down this road, but large conglomerates and the government itself do.

The bond is a form of a loan, albeit a large one. The holder of it is called the lender (think bank or larger) while the issuer is the borrower. Banks aren’t the only institutions that can issue bonds, as public authorities, credit institutions and companies can also do it to build their wealth.

The common process is one of underwriting, where one or more securities firms join together to form a syndicate. This syndicate then buys an entire issue of bonds from the issuer and then resells them to investors around the world. This is the case for many transactions, however, the government has bonds issued at auction which is a whole other issue entirely.

While both stocks and bonds are securities, they do differ in how they are bought, how they are sold and how they are traded. Stocks for instance don’t have a maturity date that you have to pay them off by as they are things you purchase in the first place. Having stock in something is a whole other idea to having a bond in it.…

What is a credit card? A credit card is a card that allows you to borrow money to pay for things. There will be a limit to how much you can spend called your credit limit. At the end of each month you can either pay off the whole of the amount you owe or make a minimum repayment. Other kinds of cards include: 1) A cheque guarantee card, issued by your bank, that you can use to ensure that your cheque will be honored up to a certain limit.

2) A chargecard where you have to repay the full amount at the end of each month.

3) A debit card, issued by your bank, where whatever you spend is immediately deducted from your bank account Do you need a credit card? Using a credit card is a useful way of making purchases: a) A credit card means you do not need to carry huge amounts of cash around and risk losing it.

B) A credit card means you can buy items over the internet.

C) A credit card means you can make purchases abroad without having to worry about local currency.

D) A credit card gives the opportunity to spread the cost of a large payment over several months.

E) A credit card is useful in an emergency. For example, an unexpected repair to your house or car.How do you choose a credit card? The main two UK credit card issuers are Visa and Mastercard. These are accepted in most places and in 130 countries worldwide. Beware of less well known brands that may not be accepted everywhere. Before you choose which credit card is the best for you, remember to read the terms and conditions carefully. Never sign up for a credit card without fully understanding what you are agreeing to. Remember that all the plus factors will be prominently displayed in large print. You may have to study the small print carefully to discover if there are any negative factors.
A list of the current cards on offer in summary is available on this credit card summary page. What You Need To Consider: 1) APR (Annual Percent Rate)

This is the rate of interest that you will pay on any outstanding balance. 2) Special Introductory Rates

You may be offered a low or 0% rate of interest for a limited time (Up to 6 months) when you sign up for a new card. A higher rate of interest may be charged for cash withdrawals. 3) Balance Transfer Rate

Card issuers may offer you a lower rate of interest if your swap your balance from another credit card to their. 4) Interest Free period

Remember to check when interest payments will begin. Will you pay interest from the day of the purchase? Or will you have a number of days interest free before you begin to pay? There is usually no interest free period for cash withdrawals. 5) Cashback and Rewards

Some cards over points or rewards for …