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Day: February 24, 2017

USANA MLM Business – Opportunity Or Scam?

Usana Health Sciences has become a very large and well-known health and wellness network marketing company They offer a variety of healthy self-care and home-care products, as well as an income opportunity if a person becomes a distributor and sells their products.

However, there are some very real concerns and issues about starting or participating in a Usana business. In this article, I will provide and unbiased review of the pros and cons of developing a Usana business, and see if we can find out whether Usana is a great opportunity – or a great scam.

  • Usana – The Good
  • Usana was founded by Dr. Myron Wentz, a microbiologist and immunologist. Dr. Wentz began Gull Laboratories in 1974, and built it from a one-man operation to a leading provider of viral diagnostic tools. In 1992, Wentz sold his stake in Gull Labs and began Usana with the hope of preventing disease, not just treating disease. Today they offer a line of high-quality supplements and personal care items.

    For distributors, Usana pays out with a binary compensation plan, where a representative builds a left-side and a right-side simultaneously. One of the good things about their compensation plan is the fact there is no monthly group volume requirements. Commissions are earned based on group sale volume (GSV).

    Another big pro about beginning a Usana business is the need – currently, the demand for products that might help in the prevention of disease is huge. With the current marketing trends being what they are, you can sell just about anything that has “anti-oxidant” written on it.

  • Usana – The Bad
  • Usana is a network marketin company, which simply means that a distributor can go join and build a downline, and grow a distribution channel. The first flag that we noted was that Usana encourages their distributors to purchase business opportunity leads (or bizop leads) to grow your organization. The problem with opportunity-seeking leads is that nine times out of ten, they are not really looking for an opportunity. In fact, the way that many opportunity leads are gathered is rather misleading. The process works like this: you are out surfing the web, looking at different sites, and you suddenly see a pop-up ad to win a free toaster if you take a quick survey. If you take that survey, you will be asked to submit your name and phone number to get your free toaster. The minute you fill out that form, you actually become an opportunity-seeking lead.

    For people that have used opportunity leads before, this would explain why so many times when they contact the lead, they have no idea how they got put on an opportunity-seeking list. Also, these types of lead lists are sold and re-sold multiple times, so that when you get around to contacting the lead, they have already talked to eight different people with a “huge business opportunity”.

  • Usana – The Ugly
  • The reason that so many network marketing businesses have such a bad reputation is …

    Seven Major Differences Between Chinese and American Business Cultures

    Understanding cultural difference is the key in building lasting relationships with your business partners abroad. China has a long and rich history and culture that has built a business environment that is markedly different than U.S. business culture:

    1. Relationship-based versus transaction-based

    Relationships come before economics in China whereas in the U.S. economics generally take a front row seat to relationships. Chinese people do business with people they know and trust.

    Rather than getting into business discussion immediately once you meet, take time and get to know your potential partners abroad; invest now for payoff later. Once trust has been built, Chinese business people will gladly share their thoughts with you and will give you honest feedback. One way to build the trust and rapport is to hang out outside the office hour, for instance, invite them to lunch or dinner.

    2. Face to face interactions versus doing business without meeting in person

    Most of Chinese business activities and deals are made through face-to-face interactions. To successfully launch in China, you will need to visit China and build relationships with your partners through frequent face-to-face interactions. To accommodate Chinese business culture norms, many American companies have opened offices and hired locals in China to facilitate business in this foreign market. Other American companies form partnerships with local companies to bypass the need to establish a branch or office abroad.

    3. Negotiations: prepare to haggle

    There is a huge difference in the way negotiations take place in the U.S versus China. Chinese people tend to haggle and to believe that there is room for negotiation on every deal. U.S companies need to make a padded proposal. Always start with a reasonable proposal regardless and expect multiple rounds of negotiations.

    4. Entertaining is a part of business

    In China, entertaining (hosting) is an integral part of the business culture. In most instances, inviting potential partners or employees to dinner is appropriate and considered an informal meeting. A dinner with potential business partners may be used as a way to build trust and deepen a relationship. It may be used as a way to solicit feedback that you may be unable to obtain during the standard workday or in the typical work setting. A dinner or other social outing is also an appropriate way to follow up with deals informally agreed upon.

    5. Communication style

    Chinese people tend to be quiet and reserved in business settings while Americans tend to be outspoken and eloquent. This cultural difference may make it challenging for U.S. companies to obtain the information they seek such as concerns, feedback, outright rejections, etc. Many times it may take a series of formal and informal meetings to reach your desired goal.

    6. Closing a deal

    Unlike in the U.S., in China the signing of a contract does not mean immediate business. After a contract is signed, understand that this is the beginning of the arrangement; follow up with your new partner and look for actions. Actions taken on the Chinese …