October 10, 2016

The 8 Training Principles are research-based guidelines that can help you accelerate your training progress and optimize your results. Knowing how to apply these principles gives you an educated basis on which you can make informed decisions about designing your fitness or sports training program. The principles can also help you evaluate the merits of fitness equipment and personal training services.

All of the principles complement each other. For best results, they should be applied in concert throughout every phase of training.

1. Principle of Specificity suggests that your body will make adjustments according to the type of training you perform and in the very same muscles that you exercise. How you train determines what you get.

This principle guides you in designing your fitness training program. If your goal is to improve your overall level of fitness, you would devise a well-rounded program that builds both endurance and overall body strength. If you want to build the size of your biceps, you would increase weight loads on bicep curls and related exercises.

2. The Principle of Overload implies that you must continually increase training loads as your body adapts over time. Because your body builds and adjusts to your existing training regimen, you must gradually and systematically increase your work load for continued improvement.

A generally accepted guideline for weight training is to increase resistance not more than 10% per week. You can also use percentages of your maximum or estimated maximum level of performance and work out within a target training zone of about 60-85% of maximum. As your maximum performance improves, your training loads will increase, as well.

3. The Principle of Recovery assets that you must get adequate rest between workouts in order to recuperate. How much rest you need depends upon your training program, level of fitness, diet, and other factors.

Generally, if you perform a total body weight workout three days per week, rest at least 48 hours between sessions. You can perform cardio more frequently and on successive days of the week.

Over time, too little recovery can result in signs of overtraining. Excessively long periods of recovery time can result in a detraining effect.

4. The Principle of Reversibility refers to the loss of fitness that results after you stop training. In time, you will revert back to your pre-training condition. The biological principle of use and disuse underlies this principle. Simply stated, If you don’t use it, you lose it.

While adequate recovery time is essential, taking long breaks results in detraining effects that may be noticeable within a few weeks. Significant levels of fitness are lost over longer periods. Only about 10% of strength is lost 8 weeks after training stops, but 30-40% of endurance is lost in the same time period.

The Principle of Reversibility does not apply to skills. The effects of stopping practice of motor skills, such as weight training exercises and sport skills, are very different. Coordination appears to store in long-term motor memory and …

Orthodontic billing is one of the things that gets questioned all the time and in all truth, it probably deserves its own book. There are a number of reasons for the confusion that crops up between providers and insurance personnel whenever orthodontics comes into the picture. However, it’s just tough to make nifty catch-phrases over something that should be simple and relatively mundane. As we talk about some of these items remember that we are coming to you from an insurance adjusters point of view.

How Does Insurance View Orthodontics?

Let’s start with the insurance side of the coin. For an insurance company, orthodontics can be a big pain in the you know what. We have multiple providers supplying multiple types of services and billing for them in a myriad of billing styles. Some bill all up front. Some providers charge their patients a certain amount based on what their insurance will pay. Some providers have adjustable payment plans to allow patients to gradually pay for services over the years. All of these options and more make orthodontics billing more complicated than it should be.

From the insurance side, orthodontic benefits are strictly limited. Almost every plan we’ve ever seen has a maximum lifetime benefit. Note that there ARE exceptions to this rule, but an open-ended orthodontics maximum is an extremely rich benefit and is definitely being seen less and less these days. These benefits are usually applied to the individual patient, but may also apply to the entire family in some cases. For example, little Susie Jones who has a $1,000 lifetime maximum benefit for orthodontics goes to an Orthodontist and has $1,500 worth of work performed. The insurance company pays out based on their coverage level – usually 50 percent or 60 percent, which would make the payment in this situation $750 or $900 respectively. If Susie needs an additional $1,000 worth of work, she will only receive $250 or $100 – again dependent on coverage level. If the $1,000 orthodontic lifetime maximum applies to her entire family, then there will be NO other payments for any other members of her family. This is the starting point of view for insurance companies and different companies have different payment philosophies based on this starting point.

How Does Insurance Pay Orthodontics?

Some companies are just tired of dealing with orthodontics. They acknowledge that there is a strict limit put on orthodontic benefits, so they don’t even bother messing with it. They’re doing this because somebody somewhere made the decision that it costs more to try and review these claims than that review would be worth. Some companies take the opposite approach, since orthodontics can be such a big-ticket item. They’re going to require you to submit a logical, well-thought-out plan documenting every step of the process in that patient’s treatment. Then there’s another approach still in which the insurance company tries to control these treatments to ensure that the patient is really getting his money’s worth out of his …