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Day: August 31, 2016

What a Tour Broker Is and How to Become One

A person who operates a tour company is a broker. A broker is a middleman. Brokers buy or arrange items or services and sells these items or services to the end buyer. Some examples of brokers are:

Independent insurance agents. These agents do not provide insurance; they arrange insurance for you from an insurance company. Insurance agents usually get a commission from an insurance company.

Stock brokers. Like insurance agents, stock brokers help you buy and sell stock. They don’t own the stock. These brokers also receive a commission based on the amount sold.

Real estate broker. Again, these brokers do not own the properties they sell and they get a commission based on the value of what they sell.

There are also tour brokers. Tour brokers serve a variety of customers. This article is about what a tour brokerage is and the basics of this business.

Here is a good description if what a tour is: A trip with visits to various places of interest for business, pleasure, or instruction.

Here travel is defined: To go from one place to another, as on a trip; journey.

A tour, then, is not only travel but it is travel with the purpose being pleasure or interest. You may think of a tour as extended travel with the object being to see and experience an area. Travel, on the other hand, is usually only about moving from one place to another.

A tour broker works with people on a continuous basis. If you are going to get involved in this type of business you should like working with people – you have to be a people person.

Tour brokers are not travel agents. Travel agents arrange for the travel needs of their customers. Usually a travel agent will only work with individuals or small groups (families, for example). Travel agents also always buy something that is already in place (air travel, car rentals, hotels, etc.), they do not originate anything.

Tour brokers originate – they arrange tours, they arrange the transportation, they arrange the lodging, they arrange the meals, and they arrange other services for their clients. A tour broker plans on what kind of tour he/she wants to operate.

Next, the tour broker makes arrangements for the various components of the tour – transportation, food, lodging, attractions, etc.

There are many types of tour companies. Some offer guided tours of a local area – tours of a city or an attraction, for example. Some offer tours in a natural setting – guided tours through the Grand Canyon fall into this category. Some offer tours to various national and state parks. Some offer tours through a large area, a multi-state tour is a good example.

IF YOU LIKE TO TRAVEL – FOR FREE – THIS IS A GREAT BUSINESS TO BE IN

You may have to do inspections of the hotels and attractions that you will be making a part of your tour. If you have been taught correctly you will know …

20 Pieces Of Equipment For Your Cake Business

If you have decided that starting a cake business from home is perfect for you, then you may have some initial questions. Overall, a cake business is reliably straightforward but chocked full of options when it comes to equipment and supplies. Let's go over some of the general products you may need for your cake business and some of the extra specialty items you may enjoy having.

1. Heavy Duty Mixer – most people own a mixer but you may want to upgrade if you are planning on starting a cake business from home.

2. Pans – As you know, these come in all shapes and sizes. Your three basic include your circular, versatile or character shaped. Tip: Do not skimp on good quality cake pans, it does make a difference!

3. Large, heavy duty cooling racks.

4. Turntables for decorating. Make sure they are sturdy!

5. Good, quality separators for multi-layered cakes.

6. A camera to take beautiful pictures of your cakes so future clients can see your work.

7. An air brusher is definitely an item that is not necessary. But, as your business grows and your cake decorating art develops, you may want to invest in one.

8. A projector for the more serious cake business entrepreneurs. This will help you intensify the designs that go onto your specialty cakes. Again, this is not a necessity but definitely a luxury for those who want it.

9. Bowls and spatulas for mixing!

10. Food colors for painting!

11. Obviously an oven for baking the cakes themselves.

12. Icing tubes, icing bags and accessories.

13. Rolling pins, non-stick boards and mats.

14. Brushes for painting if you are into that sort of decorating for your cake business.
15. Thermometers.

16. Dummy Cakes.

17. Knives and Cake Levelers.

18. Flower making accessories are a great investment to help add a little style to your cakes.

19. Books on cake businesses and cake decorating for new ideas and tips.

20. A couple of great web resources such as sites or forums where you can talk to other cake decorators, ask questions and share your knowledge with others!

Now, if you did not before, you have a great list to start from. Some of these items are less necessary than others. It is up to you how much you can invest in the start-up of your business. If you just want to begin making one-layered birthday cakes then you may not need everything on this list. But who knows, hopefully your business will boom from the beginning and then you will need every item on this list and more! …

Personal Financial Planning – Risk Management

Risk management in financial planning is the systematic approach to the discovery and treatment of risk. The objective is to minimize worry by dealing with the possible losses before they happen.

The process involves:

Step 1: Identification

Step 2: Measurement

Step 3: Method

Step 4: Administration

Risk Identification

The process begins by identifying all potential losses that can cause serious financial problems.

(1) Property Losses – The direct loss that requires replacement or repair and indirect loss that requires additional expenses as a result of the loss.

(For example, the damage of the car incurs repair cost and additional expenses to rent another car while the car is being repaired.)

(2) Liability Losses – It arises from the damage of other’ property or personal injury to others.

(For example, the damage to public property as a result of a car accident.)

(3) Personal Losses – The loss of earning power due to death, disability, sickness or unemployment and the extra expenses incurred as a result of injury or illness.

(For example, the loss of employment due to cancer and the required treatment cost in addition to normal living expenses.)

Risk Measurement

Subsequently, the maximum possible loss (i.e. the severity) associated with the event as well as the probability of occurrence (i.e. the frequency) is quantified.

(1) Property Risk – The replacement cost necessary to replace or repair the damaged asset is estimated by a comparable asset at the current price. Indirect expenses for alternative arrangements like accommodation, food, transport, etc, needs to be taken into account.

(2) Liability Risk – This is considered to be unlimited as it will depend upon the severity of the event and the amount the court awards to the aggrieved party.

(3) Personal Risk – Estimate the present value of the required living expenses and additional expenses per year and computing it over a predetermined number of years at some assumed interest rate and inflation.

Methods Of Treating Risk

A combination of all or several techniques are used together to treat the risk.

(1) Avoidance – The complete elimination of the activity.

This is the most powerful technique, but also the most difficult and may sometimes be impractical. In addition, care must be taken that avoidance of one risk does not create another.

(For example, to avoid the risk associated with flying, never take a flight on the plane.)

(2) Segregation – Separating the risk.

This is a simple technique that involves not putting all your eggs in one basket.

(For example, to avoid both parents dying in a car crash together, travel in separate vehicles.)

(3) Duplication – Have more than one.

This technique requires preparation of additional back up(s).

(For example, to avoid the loss of use of a car, have 2 or more cars.)

(4) Prevention – Forestall the risk from happening.

This technique aims to reduce the frequency of the loss occurring.

(For example, to prevent fires, keep matches away from children.)

(5) Reduction – Minimize the magnitude of loss.

This …