June 27, 2016

Minnesota residents interested in becoming an insurance claims adjuster will first need to obtain the Minnesota adjuster license. Non-residents interested in working claims in Minnesota may also be required to obtain this license before obtaining an assignment. This is a state that typically yields a high number of residential, commercial, and auto lines claims due to wind, hail, and ice. Cat adjusters are well served by holding this license. Follow these 3 steps to obtain and maintain your claims adjuster license in Minnesota:

Step 1) Observe the Licensing Requirements

Residents of Minnesota must be 18 years of age. No experience, sponsorship, or bonding is required. Residents must take and pass the Minnesota adjuster exam. The most comprehensive Minnesota adjuster license, the Fire, Allied Lines, and Casualty Adjuster, can only be obtained by taking the Fire, Allied Lines and Casualty exam administered by Promissor. State exams can be difficult but exam study packages are available that greatly increase the passing ratio among testers.

Reciprocity: Non-residents who hold a license in their home state can obtain the Minnesota license reciprocally. Non-residents who do not hold or cannot obtain a license in their state of residence must pass the Minnesota adjuster exam given by Promissor. Once again, exam study packages greatly assist in ensuring you pass the test the first time.

Step 2) Obtain the Adjuster License

To become a licensed Minnesota claims adjuster, you will need to complete and submit the Minnesota online adjuster application through Sircon and pay the $50 licensing fee. Certification that the Promissor exam has been passed must be submitted electronically by the License Exam Administrator. In place of passing results from the Minnesota Adjuster examination, applicant must submit via fax, documentation of passing results for an equivalent adjuster examination taken in another state, in order for their application to be processed.

Step 3) Maintain the License

Licensed Minnesota claims adjusters must renew their license every two years. The initial Continuing Education requirement is 15 hours for the first two years. Thereafter, 30 hours are required to maintain compliance for each two year reporting period.

Summary: Residents of Minnesota who plan to adjust in Minnesota must first obtain the Minnesota adjuster license. The Fire, Allied Lines, and Casualty Adjuster license is this state’s most comprehensive license and requires an examination through Promissor. Exam study packages can provide very helpful prep assistance and drastically increase test success percentages. This busy claims state’s license can also offer an attractive license for non-resident independent adjusters. For additional licensing information, refer to the complete online guide to become a licensed Minnesota claims adjuster.…

Steel Detailing for me is my life. If you had to ask the question, if I chose it for my life I would say “Deep down YES”. I just fell into it.

It all started when I was 18 looking for work straight out of High School. I was accepted into an apprenticeship as a Structural Designer for a company in Newcastle, NSW, Australia, working on mining designs. Back then the office was decked out with drawing boards, smoking was permitted and an ammonia copier.

The job involved standing behind the ammonia copier copying drawings onto CPR’s, Penmanship, small drafting jobs, the coffee run and the food run for the first 6 months. This was my introduction into detailing steelwork for mining jobs throughout The Hunter Region and it was all coal process and handling.

Little did I know, the owner of company had a habit of starting and closing companies on a regular basis and my job only lasted just over 6 months. This was just enough for me to continue into this career with just a small taste.

Since then I have worked for many prominent design companies and have gained extensive experience. It wasn’t until I was given the opportunity start my own company with the backing of a building company in Thornton, NSW, Australia before I really began to learn fast.

The company went from just me to 6 people in a small 2 year period and was working really hard. I cannot emphasize the Really Hard part enough as the hours were long. The reason for this is that I was working in the business and not on the business and because I was the business owner, it had to run smoothly in order for it to grow.

For those that have not had experience with steel detailing there is a process you must follow.

Firstly, you are asked to provide a quote. If the quote is accepted, you are presented with a set of Structural Engineering drawings and a set of Architectural drawings depending on the project category. There are 3 main categories – Mining, Industrial and commercial. Mining has no architectural requirement.

Secondly, you go through the drawings and work out areas that maybe of concern and require more information and request the information. Usually at this stage because the information is going to change the amount of work you have to do, so you would ask for a variation if the work is allot more than you originally estimated.

Thirdly, the client accepts the variation and you begin the project. As the company owner I usually started the project layout for the rest of the team to detail the steelwork. The layout was completed in AutoCAD and consisted of the plan view with all of the elevations projected surrounding the Plan.

At the end of the day I was the checker also. “Why” did I check the drawings you may ask. It’s plainly obvious, the buck stopped with me. If there was …